Sunday, December 29, 2013

Why Michigan, Notre Dame and Other Teams Throw So Many Games

"The history of the great events of this world is scarcely more than the history of crime." -- Voltaire

This is for all the Michigan fans out there who struggle to understand why the Wolverines' proud football tradition has been on such a severe downward spiral in recent years. And what I'm saying here about my alma mater, Michigan, also goes for some of my other favorite teams, including Notre Dame, Michigan State, Indiana, Purdue, Butler, North Carolina, the Chicago Bears, Chicago Cubs, Chicago Bulls, Indianapolis Colts and Indiana Pacers.

High-ranking Freemasons are responsible for most of the corruption that's decimating college and professional sports. And sometimes they fix games to punish me for breaking away from the Masonic cult into which I was born or to punish me for something I said, wrote or did in the days and hours leading up to game time, or even during the game.

All this is possible because the Masons have had me under illegal surveillance my entire life. And for the past 10 years, I've been under illegal surveillance in the "privacy" of my own home with top-secret, classified, military-grade surveillance equipment that allows the perpetrators to see through the walls of my home. See www.brussellsprout.blogspot.com.


George Washington in Masonic regalia
Masons have infiltrated all our institutions, and they've been plotting to destroy the United States and merge it into a global fascist dictatorship known as the New World Order for hundreds of years. They were responsible for establishing the U.S. government from the start. George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and virtually all the Founding Fathers were Masons.

Quoting from the article linked below:

"Freemasonry is the Church of Lucifer masquerading as a fraternal mystical philanthropic order. It fronts for Illuminati central bankers who started the United States as a vehicle to advance their New World Order."

"Benjamin Franklin, who was the Grand Master of a French lodge, raised millions of francs crucial to financing George Washington's army. He was the first to submit a concrete plan for military collaboration and political federation to a Congress representing all colonies. He established a chain of Masonic newspapers in all of the colonies."

See this: http://www.henrymakow.com/the_united_states_is_a_masonic.html

Another thing you have to understand about the Freemasons is their obsession with occult numbers. Watch for these numbers in the final scores, halftime scores, score by quarters and statistics of games that are fixed by the Masons: 3, 6, 9, 13, 22, 23, 26, 30, 33, 55, 63 and 66. See this:
Freemasons Leave Their Fingerprints All Over the Crime Scene

The number 33 is an important number to Freemasons because the 33rd degree is the highest degree of corruption available in the Masonic power structure. That's why Michigan lost to Florida State, 33-32, in the crooked Orange Bowl game on Dec. 30, 2016.

The number 63 is significant to Masons because they assassinated President Kennedy in 1963. And on the weekend of the 50th anniversary of Kennedy's public execution, they used the number in the final score when the Michigan basketball team "lost" to North Carolina-Charlotte, 63-61, on Nov. 24, 2013. And 61 was the year President Kennedy was inaugurated, so both numbers in the final score were a reference to President Kennedy.

If that game wasn't fixed, how else can you explain a team with three NBA prospects in the starting lineup losing to a bunch of players recruited from the local YMCA on national television? Are you really so na├»ve that you believe it was all on the level and that college basketball games are never fixed? LOL! 

In football, Devin Gardner deliberately threw the interception into heavy traffic that would have won the Ohio State game on Nov. 30, 2013. He could have scrambled around and found something better if the fix hadn't been in. And Michigan could have trounced Kansas State in the bowl game if they hadn't been required to take a dive.

Gardner was also instrumental in throwing the Notre Dame game on Sept. 6, 2014, when he tossed three deliberate interceptions. That "loss" was the first time Michigan had been shut out since 1984 -- a record-breaking streak of 365 games.

Speaking of fixes, see this post about how the Cubs threw the NLCS in 2003 and the National League East in 1969: http://sportsfraud.blogspot.com/2013/09/cubs-orioles-both-took-dive-in-1969-to.html

And see this post about how the Notre Dame women's basketball team was forced to Throw One for the Gipper against Connecticut in a Final Four game in April 2013:
http://sportsfraud.blogspot.com/2013/04/even-womens-basketball-games-are-fixed.html

And see this post about the fixing of some Michigan and Notre Dame games, as well as some Cubs games and more: http://brussellsprout.blogspot.com/2010/08/all-my-favorite-teams-take-dive.html

In order to understand why the Michigan football and basketball teams have been chronic underachievers in recent years despite having so much talent, you need to realize that in most cases, they're losing games on purpose because the fix is in. But  don't let the cover-up crew throw you off track. See this:
http://sportsfraud.blogspot.com/2013/04/dont-let-disinfo-agents-throw-you-off.html

In some cases, games are fixed as a matter of organizational policy -- the NFL, NCAA, NBA, MLB or NHL. For example, the Patriots won the Super Bowl after the 2001 season as a "patriotic" gesture following 9-11, and the Red Sox won the World Series in 2013 because of the Boston Marathon bombing.

The NCAA does the same thing by manipulating late-season games to get the matchup they want in the BCS Championship Game. In 2011, Boise State, Oregon, Stanford and Oklahoma State were all required to take a dive in November when they were in danger of qualifying for the BCS Championship Game. That was the year Alabama lost to LSU during the regular season and avenged that loss in the championship game.

Notre Dame benefited from the same sort of scenario in 2012 to qualify for the BCS Championship Game and give the NCAA the matchup they wanted against Alabama, but then the Fighting Irish were forced to throw the national championship game.

Schools with small followings such as Boise State and Oklahoma State don't stand a chance of making it to the finals.

Notre Dame is a frequent victim of the game-fixing scandal because I grew up in South Bend and was a classmate of Mike Parseghian's at Jefferson Elementary School in the fall of 1964. That was the year that Mike's father, Ara Parseghian, began his illustrious career as the head coach at Notre Dame. Also, I lived in South Bend during the 1990s while I was working for the South Bend Tribune, and my daughter graduated from Notre Dame.

Sometimes truth really is stranger than fiction. But unless you accept the truth about game-fixing, you'll never be able to understand why Michigan football teams show so much promise one week and then look terrible the next.

Another Michigan meltdown
For example, in 2010, they started out 5-0 and then lost 6 of their last 8 games to finish 7-6. That was Rich Rodriguez's last year at the helm. But it wasn't Rich Rod's fault any more than it is Brady Hoke's fault or Lloyd Carr's before them. I believe the main reason why Carr retired while he was still fairly young and in good health was that he was tired of having to throw so many games -- especially the ridiculous spectacle of the Appalachian State debacle to open the 2007 season at Michigan Stadium.

Anyway, since Michigan is always in the Top 20 in recruiting classes, and frequently in the Top 10, they should have a Top 20 team every year unless their coaches are truly awful, and I don't believe they are. The Wolverines have now lost five of their last six games against Michigan State. Is MSU in the Top 20 for recruiting every year? I don't think so. Presumably then, Michigan usually has more talent than MSU.

But talent doesn't count for much when the fix is in. We've seen proof of that during the last decade.

Is Mark Dantonio really a better coach than Lloyd Carr, Rich Rodriguez and Brady Hoke, and is MSU's staff really that much better than Michigan's? I don't buy that, either. The truth is, Michigan loses to MSU, Ohio State and other schools on a regular basis because they're required to throw the game. It's not the fault of the players or the coaches, it's just something that's required by the Masonic power structure that rules college football and the rest of the world.

The Michigan team that opened this season by trouncing Appalachian State 52-14 and the 2013 season by clobbering Central Michigan 59-9 is the real Michigan team -- the one that's allowed to give 100 percent on both sides of the ball. The only other time last season when that was the case was in the 42-13 victory over Minnesota. Every other game last season was tampered with to one extent or another, and all the games since the season opener this season have been as well.

Not that Michigan State and Ohio State are allowed to make it through the season unscathed. They're occasionally required to throw games too, or at least to shave points. Ohio State's 26-23 "loss" to Purdue in 2011 is a case in point. And the Buckeyes were forced to take a dive against Wichita State in the NCAA Tournament in 2012.

See this video for examples of how the Buckeyes threw the Wichita State game: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8jniUM2N4Yc

Ohio State defenders let Wichita State's best shooters get an uncontested look at the basket from three-point range at 5:05, 6:41 and 7:25. The last one was at a crucial point when the Buckeyes trailed just 62-59 with a couple minutes left in the game and still had a chance to win. Also note the deliberate charging foul inflicted by Ohio State at 6:19. Players getting "out of control" is a common tactic used to throw a game when the fix is in.

Michigan State was required to shave points in its season opener in 2014, a 26-13 victory over Western Michigan, and also in their 14-0 victory over Purdue. And the Spartans were required to throw the second half against Duke in the 2013 NCAA Tournament. The year before, they took a big dive against Louisville. And they took a dive against Connecticut in the 2014 tournament.

Game-fixing has been going on for most of my life, but I didn't really wake up to the fact that some of it was being directed toward me until a few years ago when I noticed that Michigan football and basketball were both in a tailspin.

Michigan football used to have a tradition of having excellent defensive teams, even when their offenses were notoriously conservative. They lost five Rose Bowls under Bo Schembechler in the 1970s, including 10-3 to USC in 1970, 13-12 to Stanford in 1972, 14-6 to USC in 1977 and 17-10 to USC in 1979. They also lost to Washington, 27-20, in 1978.

They were a big favorite against Washington that year, and that game was definitely fixed. The others probably were as well, especially that Stanford game. Michigan was 11-0 and ranked fourth in the country that year when they lost to Stanford.

But even when they lost a game back then, they were never embarrassed. It was usually a close, hard-fought struggle that left the opponent just as battered as Michigan. Those Rose Bowl games were all like that. Now, it's not unusual for Michigan to get blown out by 20 points or more.

They used to give up 10 points or less in almost every game in the 1970s. Now they sometimes give up more points in a single game than they used to give up for the entire season. A few years ago, they defeated Illinois, 67-65. And I'm talking about football, not basketball.

Speaking of basketball, Michigan was forced to throw the NCAA Championship Game in April 2013. See this: http://sportsfraud.blogspot.com/2013/04/corruption-is-widespread-in-college.html


Notre Dame has been required to throw lots of games, including the infamous loss to USC in 1974 when the Irish blew a 24-0 lead. In that game, USC scored 55 unanswered points to trounce the Irish, 55-24. It was by far the worst loss in Ara Parseghian's career at Notre Dame, and two weeks later, Ara (pictured at left) resigned, even though he was still a young man in the prime of his career. He was probably disgusted that he'd been forced to participate in such an obvious fraud. See this:

http://brussellsprout.blogspot.com/2010/08/notre-dame-usc-great-comeback-or-hoax.html


I never watch a game live anymore because if I do, it always results in a Michigan loss. If Michigan wins, I usually just try to catch a few highlights on ESPN or the Michigan web site.

Exposing the game-fixing conspiracy is my way of gaining some measure of revenge for all the heartache the Freemasons have caused me and all the other Michigan fans during the last decade. Not to mention the coaches and players.

If we had an honest Congress, we could get an investigation of the game-fixing epidemic. But Masons control the Congress, the NCAA and every other institution in this country, so the truth would never be allowed to see the light of day. We'll just have to settle for knowing the truth ourselves.

Maybe if enough people figure it out and stop going to the games, we can put an end to the game-fixing epidemic and restore the integrity of college sports. Until that happens, Michigan football will probably continue its relentless downward spiral, and Michigan basketball will continue to lose games in which they're big favorites. And to a certain extent, so will Notre Dame, Indiana, Purdue, Michigan State, Butler, North Carolina, the Chicago Bears, Chicago Cubs, Chicago Bulls, Indiana Pacers and Indianapolis Colts.

For example, the Colts lost at home, 38-8, to the lowly St. Louis Rams on Nov. 10, 2013, and then the Hoosiers struggled to defeat LIU-Brooklyn, 72-71, at home on Nov. 12.

On Nov. 16, 2013, Michigan needed three overtimes to defeat Northwestern, thanks in part to Jeremy Gallon deliberately dropping a potential game-winning touchdown pass. See the obvious game-fixing stunt at www.mgoblue.com

Then on Black Sunday, Nov. 17, the Michigan basketball team, ranked seventh in the country with at least three NBA prospects in the starting lineup, lost to unranked Iowa State, 77-70.

Meanwhile, Notre Dame, ranked 21st and an 11-point favorite, lost at home to unranked Indiana State; and North Carolina, ranked 12th and a 13-point favorite, lost at home to unranked Belmont. Two more of my favorites took a dive -- Notre Dame, because I grew up in South Bend, and North Carolina, because I live in the Tar Heel state now. See what I mean?

And then, back to football, there was the Iowa debacle on Nov. 23, 2013, when Michigan blew a 21-7 halftime lead, got shut out again in the second half, and lost 24-21. I'm not buying that one, either.

From what I could tell, it looked like Gardner coughed up the ball for no reason whatsoever to seal the deal. You'd have to be pretty naive not to realize he did that intentionally.

The most glaring fix of all on Nov. 23, 2013, was when Arizona, with former Michigan coach Rich Rodriguez at the helm, annihilated fifth-ranked Oregon, 42-16. Another obvious insult to Michigan fans because now he's suddenly successful again after leaving Ann Arbor. Like I was saying, he's always been a good football coach, and he would have been successful at Michigan if he hadn't been required to throw so many games.

But on Nov. 23, Rich Rod finally received his big reward for throwing all those games at Michigan. Are we really supposed to believe that Arizona's defense, which had already given up at least 20 points seven times that season against lesser offenses, was suddenly transformed into the immovable object against one of the most explosive offenses in college football?

If you can buy that one, I have some beachfront property in Arizona I'd like to sell you. It's right next door to Rich Rod's place.

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